Featuring Barbara Oakley

Keynote Speaker

and creator of Learning How to Learn—the world’s most highly subscribed massive open online course!

Overview

The annual Learning Technologies Symposium (LTS) event brings together McMaster faculty, staff, and students to share innovations, connect on project ideas, and exchange best practices. This year, we are inviting our neighbours (Mohawk College, Sheridan College and Brock University) to join the conversation on technology-enhanced education.

Have you recently stumbled over a project’s finish line? Have you found yourself mid-hurdle in educational research? Are you warming up for a large implementation of technology? The Learning Technology Symposium is open to all of your ideas, challenges and thinking around teaching and learning with technology.

The event will be an opportunity to share, learn, and talk about technology—collectively addressing challenges and successes, and in the process, build peer networks.

Keynote Speaker—Barbara Oakley

Dr. Barbara Oakley is a Professor of Engineering at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan; a Visiting Scholar at the University of California, San Diego; and Coursera’s inaugural “Innovation Instructor.” Her work focuses on the complex relationship between neuroscience and social behavior. Dr. Oakley’s research has been described as “revolutionary” in the Wall Street Journal—she has published in outlets as varied as the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times. She has won numerous teaching awards, including the American Society of Engineering Education’s Chester F. Carlson Award for technical innovation in engineering education. Together with Terrence Sejnowski, the Francis Crick Professor at the Salk Institute, she co-teaches Coursera – UC San Diego’s “Learning How to Learn,” the world’s most popular massive open online course.  Her book A Mind for Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science (Even If You Flunked Algebra), (Penguin, 2014) is a New York Times best-selling science book.

Dr. Oakley has adventured widely through her lifetime. She rose from the ranks of Private to Captain in the U.S. Army, during which time she was recognized as a Distinguished Military Scholar. She also worked as a communications expert at the South Pole Station in Antarctica, and has served as a Russian translator on board Soviet trawlers on the Bering Sea. Dr. Oakley is an elected Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Event Live Streaming

Can’t make it to Barbara Oakley’s keynote? We will be live streaming the event through Webex on Tuesday, October 18th from 9:35 to 10:45 am

Watch the Live Stream

Live Streaming Instructions

 Schedule—Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Time Event Details Building Room
9:00 to 9:30 am Registration  McMaster University Student Centre CIBC Hall
9:30 to 9:35 am Welcome  McMaster University Student Centre CIBC Hall
9:35 to 10:45 am
    •  Opening Plenary:Learning How to Learn Learning How to Learn Most of us are unaware of best practices in learning—particularly in the STEM disciplines. That’s not surprising. We have never studied it explicitly. Instead, we use a ragbag of methods picked up at school and work, often including practices that research have shown to be ineffective. In this talk Dr Barbara Oakley walks us through how to learn effectively, drawing on her extensive experience as an engineering professor and researcher and her work as co-lead on Coursera–UC San Diego’s Learning How to Learn, one of the world’s most popular MOOCs, (massive open online courses), with nearly a million students in its first year alone. She will focus on:• Why recall and chunking work • Using the brain’s different learning modes to best effect • Procrastination—aka “the pain in your brain”—and the Pomodoro technique • The study techniques that help—and those that don’t
      with Barbara Oakley
      Watch the Live Stream Here 
      Live Streaming Instructions

 

McMaster University Student Centre CIBC Hall
11:00 to 12:00 pm
  • Roundtable DiscussionsRoundtable Discussions Dr. Oakley’s keynote no doubt raises a number of implications for those designing, developing, and delivering online and blended courses. We have allotted this session for participants to discuss these ideas as well as share experiences and start/continue conversations around technology and learning.
 McMaster University Student Centre CIBC Hall
12:00 to 1:00 pm Lunch and Networking  McMaster University Student Centre CIBC Hall
1:00 to 1:45 pm Concurrent Session 1

  • Applied congnition in education: connecting lab studies to teaching practiceApplied congnition in education: connecting lab studies to teaching practice There has been ongoing research work at the Applied Cognition in Education lab at McMaster that aims to understand how cognitive principles like memory and attention can be applied to instructional design. In this talk, Dr. Kim presents recent research findings that have changed his teaching practice and looks to engage participants in a conversation on what this could mean to their practices.
    Joe Kim [45 mins]
Mills Library Community Room L304
  • Flipping an Upper-level Engineering Course using e-LessonsFlipping an Upper-level Engineering Course using e-Lessons This session details how a flipped class approach has been applied to an upper-level core chemical engineering course with the goal of improving students’ learning experience. Post-course evaluations through a survey, a course evaluation, and comparison with previous courses showed students’ examination scores were not significantly improved but that students reported substantial increase in satisfaction with flipped learning. Presenter will describes the tools and process used to develop the high-quality e-Learning content.
    Thomas Marlin [15 mins]
  • Flipping the Classroom with e-BooksFlipping the Classroom with e-Books Transitioning a traditional face-to-face to fully online delivery involves more than simply moving PowerPoints, PDFs, and other files to another course shell and talking online. Part of such a transition often involves developing a flipped component to the course such that students do foundational work before class, permitting online class time to be used for cases, problem solving, examples, tutoring, dealing with processual issues and answering questions. Technology can be used to make it both interesting and informational for students to do preparatory | foundational work thus making the devotion of pre-class energy more engaging and entertaining. The session highlights the use of opening welcome videos, weekly lecture-summary videos, light board video tutorials and e-books. We will detail our experience in designing and deploying an e-book. Tips/caveats will be shared along the way for course developers including instructors, pedagogical experts and digital media specialists. The presentation will conclude with an open discussion about the advantages and limitations of implementing and using e-books as a primary learning resource in the flipped classroom.
    Michael Piczak & Andrew O’Connor [15 mins]
McMaster University Student Centre MUSC 224
  • Scriptwriting for Online Learning VideosScriptwriting for Online Learning Videos While an increasing variety of content delivery methods are being used in online teaching and learning, video lectures remain a staple of digital pedagogy at the university level. Yet the process of effectively designing and delivering a video lecture differs quite markedly from preparing a conventional, in-class lecture. The need for meticulous scripting in particular can pose a challenge for instructors making a foray into online course development. Drawing on the presenter’s experience writing and editing scripts for the video components of McMaster’s first MOOC specialization (Finance For Everyone), this session will outline and discuss the key components of a strong video lecture script, while also considering tips and techniques for navigating the transition from traditional face-to-face lecture preparation to writing text for an online learning audience.
    Liam Stockdale [15 mins]
  • Content Curation as a Teaching & Learning StrategyContent Curation as a Teaching & Learning Strategy We typically associate the word “curation” with art galleries and museums, but with the burgeoning availability of open education resources, it can also be part of a content creation strategy. Sifting through the vast amounts of relevant content online can be challenging, but also presents opportunities to selectively collect astonishing and high-quality pieces, carefully authored by others and potentially of great value to your learners. Curating existing online materials can also offset resource-intensive media productions, such as filming and creating videos that are normally included in content-focused designs. This presentation will focus on the process of finding, evaluating, selecting, arranging, annotating and contextualizing existing and quite often, freely-available, online learning materials in order to create a rich learning experience. Whether you plan to curate all of the content, or also want to create some your own, we will explore what mix is right for you, and look at a few tools that can help make the process easier.
    Joanne Kehoe [15 mins]
McMaster University Student Centre MUSC 203
  • Lessons From a Basement Studio: How to Make a Riveting Online ClassLessons From a Basement Studio: How to Make a Riveting Online Class This talk describes the key elements behind the making of high quality educational videos for online learning, including scripting, filming, and editing. There are many features of top-quality educational videos that are often overlooked by educators, including the importance of motion (“talking heads” do not count as motion); targeted graphics (avoidance of clip art); elimination of extraneous seconds; use of hands; “chunking” of key concepts; why unexpected humour is important; and the value of creating two separate video tracks. This practical talk provides insights from the creator of Learning How to Learn, the world’s most popular MOOC, with well over a million students from over 200 countries in the first eighteen months alone. It is surprising to learn that despite its immense global reach and popularity, Learning How to Learn was put together for less than $5,000 dollars in an amateur basement studio. The easy-to-grasp and inexpensive techniques described in this talk are available to all instructors and course developers who are looking to create high quality online experiences for students.
    Barbra Oakley[45 mins]
Mills Library Connection Centre L113
2:00 to 2:45 pm Concurrent Session 2

  • #technology #filmeducation #noncognitiveskills #technology #filmeducation #noncognitiveskills In this session, we are opening up a conversation about the ways in which the implementation of technology in education can address the development of non-cognitive skills, such as curiosity, empathy, collaboration, creativity and critical thinking. Scholars who contribute to this conversation, point out that technology is dramatically changing almost every domain of human activity. One such domain is mass media, which today stretches from television to vlogs and social media, and from podcasts to video games and beyond. It could be interesting to reflect on and to discuss the role that mass-media plays in shaping a sense of awareness about the world, and in fostering or inhibiting non-cognitive skills. The conversations about technology and education point to the fact that schools have not sufficiently integrated the use of technology in their pedagogical practices, and that the some of the most creative uses of technology, particularly among youth, usually occur outside of the school system. We are opening up the conversation with a short discussion about film education. Drawing on fieldwork research and ongoing conversations, this discussion will invite reflection on how film education can potentially address media literacy, the introduction of technology in the classroom, the circulation of knowledge, and the development of non-cognitive skills.
    Ana-Maria Dragomir & Varun Puri [45 mins]
McMaster University Student Centre MUSC 224
  • Twitter as a Teaching Tool in the Social Science ClassroomTwitter as a Teaching Tool in the Social Science Classroom Social media platforms have become a primary channel through which we consume news and information about current events. As an instructor in the social sciences, I have been experimenting with ways to effectively leverage this medium to help students connect what they learn in the classroom to what is happening “real world”, thereby enhancing both their engagement with course material and their capacity to apply their knowledge toward developing more sophisticated understandings of social reality. This session will share my experiences developing and integrating Twitter-based activities in two first-year social science courses—a small seminar-style inquiry-based course, and a large introductory lecture course. In addition to explaining “how” I went about it, I will discuss both how the use of Twitter has improved the learning environment, as well as the major difficulties I have encountered in each context. The overall aim will be to stimulate further discussion about the merits of integrating social media in undergraduate teaching and additional techniques for doing so.
    Liam Stockdale [15 mins]
  • My ongoing experiment with using social media to increase student engagement in #MacIntroPsych: Preliminary findings, #sofarsogood My ongoing experiment with using social media to increase student engagement in #MacIntroPsych: Preliminary findings, #sofarsogood Twitter, as a professional social media tool, allows you to promote research interests, engage with your students, and create curated archives on a variety of topics. In this session, I will share what I have learned over the last year using Twitter to promote my lab research interests in Applied Cognition in Education and engage with my #MacIntroPsych students. I have found quality tweets beats quantity; time and thoughtful effort will build a following. Creative ideas like a contest that challenges students to create Memes that demonstrate course content are fun ways to interact outside of the class. Our course #MacIntroPsych hashtag has also serves as a record of the interesting things that happen in my teaching (in real time) and often generates interest from those not even taking the course. As I continue in my Twitter experiment, I continue to refine and find better ways to bring in students and teach them that learning continues outside the class. .
    Joe Kim [15 mins]
Mills Library Communty Room L304
  • Keeping Faculty and Students Engaged in an Online Course Keeping Faculty and Students Engaged in an Online Course The success of an online course can depend greatly on how actively engaged the faculty and students are with each other, with the content, and with the technology. There are a number of challenges that faculty face when designing and delivering their online courses that can directly affect the level of engagement. This session will explore some of these challenges and discuss strategies to increase engagement drawing on lessons learned from Educational Technologies in Higher Education –an online course in the MSc Health Science Education program.
    Ilana Bayer  [15 mins]
  • Chasing the Dream: The Engaged LearnerChasing the Dream: The Engaged Learner The term “engaging” is used so often today in describing learning needs and expectations that one begins to tune it out as part of the everyday learning lexicon. In a world where more and more of what we do everywhere is in some way linked to technology, it should come as no surprise that the learning and development space would be affected in a similar way. Authoring software seems to have taken over as the flavour of the day in that domain. That being said, technology is not the only way to achieve an engaging experience with learners, in fact in many cases it is far from that. While it sometimes holds the key to engagement, it is not always necessary. Just the same, let’s explore this important concept. Come prepared to share your success stories in terms of achieving high levels of engagement with or without technology.
    Dan Piedra [15 mins]
Mills Library Connections Centre L113
  • Peer Review in PebblePad Peer Review in PebblePad Peer review is an effective way to engage students in providing each other feedback which can deepen learning. PebblePad is not just restricted to peer reviewing portfolios, but can be used to peer review any document. This session will cover the ways that you can use PebblePad at McMaster as a central hub for peer review activity.
    Jon Kruitof [15 Minutes)
  • Individual Assessment vs. Participatory LearningIndividual Assessment vs. Participatory Learning I will explain my rationale for a blended model of learning and assessment in a large-scale foreign language class. Since single instructors cannot impose stringent oversight constraints on the quality of collaborative project, the individual knowledge base of the student contributor must be very strong from the onset. The knowledge base should also include and promote participatory learning, but what about the individual responsibility of the student team member? Through meaningful instructional scaffolding and guidance on self-directed learning, teachers can help students produce quality projects. An example will be provided.
    Wendy D’Angelo [15 Minutes]
McMaster Student University Centre MUSC 203
3:00 to 4:00 pm
  • Roundtable Discussions/ReflectionsRoundtable Discussions/Reflections This session brings all participants back together to discuss areas of interest or topics they want to learn more about. Topics include: social media, Copyright and digital lending/Copyleft, Team-based approaches to online course development, student engagement, open educational content, and Where do I start with technology? Participants will have the opportunity to join discussion on at least two topics. Have other topics in mind? You will be able to choose your own table topic and invite other interested parties to begin the conversation.
 McMaster University Student Centre  CIBC Hall

Schedule—Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Time Event Details Building Room
9:30 to 10:15 am Concurrent Session 3

  • “Jump in, start, and go! It’s the right thing to do”: Developing an online teaching and learning resource on accessibility“Jump in, start, and go! It’s the right thing to do”: Developing an online teaching and learning resource on accessibility Since the passing of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) in 2005, post-secondary institutions have been actively working to meet technical legislative compliance as well as to proactively enhance accessibility and the inclusion of students/faculty/staff with disabilities on campus. Many schools are turning to technology to develop, host, and disseminate resources and trainings related to the AODA and accessibility. At McMaster, the Accessibility in Teaching and Learning team has been developing an online training module for all instructional staff that will be released in 2017, as well as a short introductory video intended to inspire educators to further integrate accessibility into course design and classroom practices. In this presentation, we will screen our video of interviews with McMaster faculty sharing their values, motivations, and commitments related to integrating accessible teaching and learning principles into their courses. We hope to solicit participant feedback on this resource. In the process, we will illustrate what an accessible approach to developing an accessibility video might look like – by especially highlighting the importance of community consultation and the meaningful involvement of students/instructors with disabilities.
    Ali Babar, Kate Brown, Alise de Die, & Shaila Kumbhare [45 mins]
McMaster University Student Centre MUSC 318
  • Differentiating Virtual Reality & Augmented RealityDifferentiating Virtual Reality & Augmented Reality The relatively recent increase in computing power available to consumers (whether it be via smartphones or personal computers) has allowed for a growing abundance of AR and VR ready devices, each of which provides the computing and video processing capabilities needed for augmented and virtual reality in our classrooms. Rapidly decreasing costs have also allowed these technologies to become relatively affordable, and many academic institutions have already begun to integrate the technologies within their own classrooms. As these distinct yet similar technologies become increasingly available and ingrained in the public consciousness, it is wise to discuss and differentiate between the two technologies as we consider them for our own use. In this talk I will discuss the definitions, attributes, and brief history of each technology (augmented reality and virtual reality) in an effort to provide clarity on what exactly AR and VR are. Afterwards, Jason will discuss and show examples of how the technologies are being used in our classrooms today. This discussion will also include information on his own work with the McMaster Anatomy Lab and their pending investigation on the use of the Microsoft HoloLens, as they seek to determine the effectiveness of augmented reality’s ability to replace cadavers within their educational program.
    Jason Lamb [45 mins]
Mills Library Wong e-Classroom L107
  • Learning Technologies and Foundational Skills in a Level-1 Social SciencesLearning Technologies and Foundational Skills in a Level-1 Social Sciences This presentation will share some of the ways in which various learning technologies have been implemented in the context of Social Sciences 1T03, a skills-based course at McMaster. A goal of the course design has been to find ways to connect Learning Management features such as visual widgets, gamification badges, and quizzes with interactive online content and in-person tutorials, with the latter taking place in newly-opened active learning classrooms.
    Mark Busser [45 mins]
Mills Library MacPherson Classroom
10:30 to 11:15 am Concurrent Session 4

  • Assistive technology training for students with intellectual disabilities in an inclusive post secondary programAssistive technology training for students with intellectual disabilities in an inclusive post secondary program The Community Integration through Cooperative Education (CICE) program for students with intellectual disabilities or significant learning disabilities is an inclusive post-secondary program. Mohawk College CICE students are currently dependent upon the Learning Facilitators (LF) for support with the completion of homework, assignments, projects and sometimes the use of age-appropriate social communication skills. Providing an assistive technology enriched environment would significantly support the CICE students’ independent learning and increase their overall learning outcomes. The desired outcome is for the research to demonstrate that students with intellectual disabilities in the CICE post-secondary program have significantly higher learning outcomes and independence when using assistive technologies. Researchers will present the findings from the year-long study, demonstrating quantitative pre- and post-assessment results, assistive technology assessments and training, as well as qualitative focus group discussions. Currently in the data collection phase, the results should demonstrate the efficacy of using assistive technology to support the CICE student population in increasing their core curriculum learning outcomes, while presenting areas for program development.
    Jennifer Curry Jahnke, Dr. Kimberly Maich, Dr. Camille Rutherford [45 mins]
McMaster University Student Centre MUSC 318
  • Layering Reality to Enhance Learning & Special EventsLayering Reality to Enhance Learning & Special Events Augmented reality apps are exploding in popularity around the world. From self-guided tours of cities to retail marketing innovations, augmented reality apps are gaining in popularity. Augmented reality is the real-time layering of digital data over our existing world. Our session will provide an overview of augmented reality and some of the more interesting apps that are currently available. We will then present some uses for augmented reality in the classroom and demonstrate how we used this technology to enhance a special event at Sheridan
    Humaira Siddiqui & Kathleen Oakley [45 mins]
Mills Library Wong e-Classroom L107
  • Synchronous collaboration through WebExSynchronous collaboration through WebEx Introducing WebEx, McMaster’s new web conferencing tool. You may be familiar with WebEx from attending a meeting with video conferencing but come experience what WebEx’s Training Centre can do for blended and online classes.
    Lavinia Oltean & Jon Kruithof – WebEx [45 mins]
Mills Library MacPherson Classroom
11:30 to 12:15 pm
  • eCampusOntario: Driving Growth and Innovation in Technology-Enabled LearningeCampusOntario: Driving Growth and Innovation in Technology-Enabled Learning After one year of operations, eCampusOntario is proud of its accomplishments and excited about its future. Cathy Newell Kelly (University of Waterloo), Linda Rees (formerly, Algonquin College) and the eCO team did a stellar job of launching the initiative in 2015-16 and implementing its portal to online programs, courses and services. With Dr. David Porter, its new leader at the helm, the organization is poised to advance online learning in Ontario by further supporting institutions with their design and development projects in online and technology-enabled learning. The current calls for proposals for development, research and innovation projects have been enthusiastically supported – so much so that we are currently at the first stage of evaluation for over 170 proposals. It is truly an exciting time for online learning development in Ontario. During this session, David will provide a quick snapshot of things underway at eCampusOntario, a glimpse of a vision for the future, and some reflections on contemporary trends and initiatives that are playing out in Canada, the United States, and beyond.
    David Porter
McMaster University Student Centre CIBC Hall
12:15 to 1:00pm
  • Lunch & Networking
McMaster University Student Centre CIBC Hall
1:00 to 1:45pm Concurrent Session 5

  • Preparing students for success, before they arrive on campusPreparing students for success, before they arrive on campus Students often arrive on campus unprepared and overwhelmed. To help better prepare our students, Sheridan has created an online transition program that helps students adjust to college life, even before they arrive on campus! Prior to starting at Sheridan, students are enrolled into an online virtual community that is specific to their program. Through interactive weekly activities, online webinars, and video tutorials, the virtual community allows students to start their program with a holistic understanding of how to be a successful student. Using technology, students are able to connect with their peers, meet their student advisor, plan their semester, be informed about academic integrity, and more! Join Andrew Staples, Student Advisor for the General Arts & Science programs at Sheridan College, as he demonstrates how technology, mobility, and webinars have helped shape and prepare students for an exciting post-secondary experience.
    Andrew Staples [15 mins]
  • Increasing participation and completion rates among academically at-risk studentsIncreasing participation and completion rates among academically at-risk students Bounce Back is one of Mohawk’s college and career skills development programs for academically at-risk students – those who earned a “Promote with Advice”, “Probation”, or “Compulsory Withdrawal” probation status in the previous semester. Students are encouraged to enroll in Bounce Back when they receive the bad news in their promotion email and have the first 8 weeks of the semester to complete the flexible 15 hour, 4 module program either online or in a blended format. Those who successfully complete the program qualify for recognition on their Co-Curricular Record and also are eligible for one of two $200 awards based on their semester to semester academic improvement. At its inception in Fall 2014, Bounce Back was a traditional delivery of 4 lecture-style weekly workshops with 4 self-directed practical activities to reinforce and apply concepts. Bounce Back moved to a more flipped approach over the next few semesters providing students more time to interact with each other and apply their learning in the workshops. This session details how this program has evolved and the lessons learned in the process.
    Catharine Ozols, Krislynn McKinlay [15 mins]
McMaster University Student Centre MUSC 318
  • Visualization of Complex Anatomy Using Augmented RealityVisualization of Complex Anatomy Using Augmented Reality We have previously shown that virtual reality (VR) and pictures are about 30% less efficacious than 3D models in learning real anatomy. The superiority of models may be due to a learning effect inherent in physically handling the model or that the 3D cadaver used for the test is most similar to the 3D model, which leads to transfer-appropriate processing (TAP). However, when physical handling of the models is removed, no significant difference in the mean scores between the groups that handle the model or view the model. TAP was also shown to be insignificant. Further research has shown that the removal of stereopsis with and eye patch removes the superiority of the models for learning anatomy. We have concluded that true 3D is required for the most effective anatomy learning. Manufacturers of augmented and virtual reality systems suggest that holograms are indistinguishable from real objects. We are testing if anatomy produced for the HoloLens holographic lens is comparable to real objects in learning anatomy. This research was supported by the Education Program in Anatomy at the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University and the MacPherson Institute.
    Michael Romaniuk, Josh Mitchell, Gancarlo Pukas, Lilian Wolak [45 Minutes]
 Mills Library MacPherson Classroom
  • Developing and Supporting Faculty in Using Educational Technologies in Higher EducationDeveloping and Supporting Faculty in Using Educational Technologies in Higher Education McMaster University and Mohawk College exemplify the growing interest in the use of educational technology in higher education as seen through increasing integration of technology within the classroom setting and the growing number of online course and program offerings. Despite this encouraging progress, the adoption of educational technologies is uneven amongst faculty. The increased integration of technology in the design and delivery of curricula has signaled the need for developing new skills and competencies for faculty. In this session, we will discuss outcomes from institutional initiatives (top-down as well as bottom-up) that seek to address the emerging digital pedagogy landscape, including a large scale needs assessment study and programming to build faculty capacity. We hope to engage with participants’ own experiences in this area to identify practical solutions..
    Ilana Bayer, Zafar Syed & Peggy French [45 mins]
 Mills Library Connection Centre L113
2:00-2:45pm Concurrent Session 6
  • The Undergraduate Student Research Hub: a consolidated online resource for aspiring researchersThe Undergraduate Student Research Hub: a consolidated online resource for aspiring researchers Educational literature consistently demonstrates the multifaceted benefits of having students engage in research at an undergraduate level. However, undergraduate students are often ill-prepared and lack the resources needed to find research opportunities that interest them and prepare successful applications. In acknowledgement of this prevalent issue, the Undergraduate Research Student Committee is preparing an interactive, open educational resource, made for students by students. Hosted on an official McMaster server and affiliated with the Office of Undergraduate Research, this website will built on the open source Plone content management system and compile and render essential tools easily accessible to students. Moreover, the website will feature a mobile-friendly platform for ease of use. A key component of the website will be an innovative, interactive calendar that is regularly populated with upcoming research events at which students can present their work. It will also include a comprehensive list of research internships and jobs, and scholarship deadlines. This calendar will be maintained semi-autonomously through a programmed “Web crawler”, the function of which is to search for and index predetermined web pages in accordance with designated keywords. Additionally, the website will host resources such as sample curriculum vitae and cover letters, as well as advice for drafting project and the ethics approval process. Questions will be solicited from the undergraduate population to create an extensive frequently asked questions section tailored to student needs. The entire website will be subject to redesign based on the feedback provided by students. Lastly, live streams featuring undergraduate students with research experience, graduate students, and professors will be hosted on the website. Students will be invited to have their questions answered in real-time.
    Anna Goshua, Michael Sun, Ishan Aditya, Tony Chen [15 mins]
  • Learning Technologies Challenges Unique to Developing Countries Environments Learning Technologies Challenges Unique to Developing Countries Environments Learning Technologies represent a significant potential and opportunity in developing countries; they can play a major role in delivering training and knowledge in an effective and cost efficient manner to disadvantaged places. There are, however, a number of challenges that limit this potential. An example is the lack of adequate and reliable communication and computer infrastructure. Most learning content seems to be moving toward increased usage of media that require higher levels of speed and capacity e.g., video. During the last few years, Etleb was directly involved in projects and initiatives for the implementation of learning technologies in Libya. That experience underscored the unique perspective of learning technologies in that kind of environment, both in terms of potential and challenges.
    Hakim Etleb [15 mins]
McMaster University Student Centre MUSC 318
  • An Automated Grading System for Math Oriented Engineering Courses An Automated Grading System for Math Oriented Engineering Courses In this work, we present the development and implementation of an automated grading system (AGS) into McMaster University’s online course management system, Avenue to Learn. This efficient grading system has been developed for two courses involving significant mathematical analysis at the School of Engineering Practice and Technology, namely, Finite Element Analysis and Discrete Mathematics. In these courses, the students take the tests/exam in two parts. In Part-A of the assessment, the students write/derive the solutions in the answer booklet, showing all work. Subsequently, upon completion of this part and with instructor authorization, the students participate in Part-B of the assessment where their calculations from several parts of every question are entered from the answer booklet into an online form. The online form is carefully designed with fill-in-the blanks and multi-select questions, so that students are unable to derive any hints or answers from the form. This is a timed task, usually lasting about 15% of the total exam time. Thus, the length of Part-B of the assessment is such that it is only sufficient for the students to enter their data from Part-A and they are unable to make any changes in the answer booklet. Upon completion of this form, the test/exam is immediately evaluated by the AGS and a grade for the test/exam is instantaneously calculated for the grade book. In addition to a quick turnaround of student scores with significant time saving in grading, this AGS helps minimize mental fatigue in instructors who handle several courses in a single term.It must be clarified that this AGS is not the same as a multiple-choice exam.
    Gaganpreet Sidhu & Seshasai Srinivasan [15 mins]
  • Digital Badges! What Are They? Do We Need Them? Digital Badges! What Are They? Do We Need Them? Digital badges have been a hot topic in educational technology. What are they? How can they help? This introductory session will talk specifically about using badges in class and badges in education.
    Jon Kruithof [15 mins]
 Mills Library MacPherson Classroom
  • MacAnatomy: A Unique Web-based Approach to the Delivery of Anatomic EducationMacAnatomy: A Unique Web-based Approach to the Delivery of Anatomic Education MacAnatomy (http://macanatomy.mcmaster.ca) is an online portal for the Education Program in Anatomy at McMaster University. It was developed to deliver effective anatomic education in an anytime, anyplace format. Effective clinical anatomy teaching involves integrating physical and digital resources in a meaningful way. MacAnatomy houses digitized, labeled prosections as well as other learning objects such as models, illustrations, purpose-built HD anatomy videos, lecture captures and standalone e-learning modules. The site has approximately 6,000 pages and over 50 GB of material. It is used as both a standalone resource as well as a resource used in conjunction with the physical specimens in the anatomy lab. In this session, we’ll provide an overview of MacAnatomy, discuss team collaboration and technologies that were used to design and develop the site, our research findings on user experience and usability of the site as well as next steps for development (e.g., pathology learning tools). Participants will have the opportunity to explore the site on their own devices.
    Xyza Brual, Ilana Bayer [45 mins]
 Mills Library Connection Centre L113
3:00-3:30
  • Closing Session
    The final session brings us back together to share our main takeaways from the past two days and identify next steps for technology integration in our own practice. The session will also feature chances to win signed copies of Barbara Oakley’s books.
 McMaster University Student Centre CIBC Hall

Sessions Information – LTS 2016


9:30 – 10:45 Welcome and Keynote (Council Chambers)

Learning how to learn (Council Chambers)

Barbara Oakley

Most of us are unaware of best practices in learning—particularly in the STEM disciplines. That’s not surprising. We have never studied it explicitly. Instead, we use a ragbag of methods picked up at school and work, often including practices that research have shown to be ineffective. In this talk Dr Barbara Oakley walks us through how to learn effectively, drawing on her extensive experience as an engineering professor and researcher and her work as co-lead on Coursera–UC San Diego’s Learning How to Learn, one of the world’s most popular MOOCs, (massive open online courses), with nearly a million students in its first year alone.  She will focus on:

  • The study techniques that help—and those that don’t
  • Why recall and chunking work
  • Using the brain’s different learning modes to best effect
  • Procrastination—aka “the pain in your brain”—and the Pomodoro technique

11:00 – 12:00 Roundtable Discussions (Council Chambers)

Dr. Oakley’s keynote no doubt raises a number of implications for those designing, developing, and delivering online and blended courses. We have allotted this session for participants to discuss these ideas as well as share experiences and start/continue conversations around technology and learning.


1:00 – 1:45 Concurrent Sessions

Applied Cognition in Education: Connecting Lab Studies to Teaching Practice

Joe Kim

45 minute presentation

There has been ongoing research work at the Applied Cognition in Education lab at McMaster that aims to understand how cognitive principles like memory and attention can be applied to instructional design. In this talk, Dr. Kim presents recent research findings that have changed his teaching practice and looks to engage participants in a conversation on what this could mean to their practices.


Flipping an Upper-level Engineering Course Using e-Lessons

Thomas Marlin

15 minute presentation

This session details how a flipped class approach has been applied to an upper-level core chemical engineering course with the goal of improving students’ learning experience. Post-course evaluations through a survey, a course evaluation, and comparison with previous courses showed students’ examination scores were not significantly improved but that students reported substantial increase in satisfaction with flipped learning. Presenter will describes the tools and process used to develop the high-quality e-Learning content.


Flipping the Classroom with e-books

Michael Piczak and Andrew O’Connor

15 minute presentation

Transitioning a traditional face-to-face to fully online delivery involves more than simply moving PowerPoints, PDFs, and other files to another course shell and talking online. Part of such a transition often involves developing a flipped component to the course such that students do foundational work before class, permitting online class time to be used for cases, problem solving, examples, tutoring, dealing with processual issues and answering questions. Technology can be used to make it both interesting and informational for students to do preparatory | foundational work thus making the devotion of pre-class energy more engaging and entertaining. The session highlights the use of opening welcome videos, weekly lecture-summary videos, light board video tutorials and e-books. We will detail our experience in designing and deploying an e-book. Tips/caveats will be shared along the way for course developers including instructors, pedagogical experts and digital media specialists. The presentation will conclude with an open discussion about the advantages and limitations of implementing and using e-books as a primary learning resource in the flipped classroom.


Scriptwriting for Online Learning Videos

Liam Stockdale

15 minute presentation

While an increasing variety of content delivery methods are being used in online teaching and learning, video lectures remain a staple of digital pedagogy at the university level. Yet the process of effectively designing and delivering a video lecture differs quite markedly from preparing a conventional, in-class lecture. The need for meticulous scripting in particular can pose a challenge for instructors making a foray into online course development. Drawing on the presenter’s experience writing and editing scripts for the video components of McMaster’s first MOOC specialization (Finance For Everyone), this session will outline and discuss the key components of a strong video lecture script, while also considering tips and techniques for navigating the transition from traditional face-to-face lecture preparation to writing text for an online learning audience.


Content Curation as a Teaching and Learning Strategy

Joanne Kehoe

We typically associate the word “curation” with art galleries and museums, but with the burgeoning availability of open education resources, it can also be part of a content creation strategy. Sifting through the vast amounts of relevant content online can be challenging, but also presents opportunities to selectively collect astonishing and high-quality pieces, carefully authored by others and potentially of great value to your learners. Curating existing online materials can also offset resource-intensive media productions, such as filming and creating videos that are normally included in content-focused designs. This presentation will focus on the process of finding, evaluating, selecting, arranging, annotating and contextualizing existing and quite often, freely-available, online learning materials in order to create a rich learning experience. Whether you plan to curate all of the content, or also want to create some your own, we will explore what mix is right for you, and look at a few tools that can help make the process easier.


Lessons from a Basement Studio: How to Make a Riveting Online Class

Barbara Oakley

This talk describes the key elements behind the making of high quality educational videos for online learning, including scripting, filming, and editing. There are many features of top-quality educational videos that are often overlooked by educators, including the importance of motion (“talking heads” do not count as motion); targeted graphics (avoidance of clip art); elimination of extraneous seconds; use of hands; “chunking” of key concepts; why unexpected humour is important; and the value of creating two separate video tracks. This practical talk provides insights from the creator of Learning How to Learn, the world’s most popular MOOC, with well over a million students from over 200 countries in the first eighteen months alone. It is surprising to learn that despite its immense global reach and popularity, Learning How to Learn was put together for less than $5,000 dollars in an amateur basement studio. The easy-to-grasp and inexpensive techniques described in this talk are available to all instructors and course developers who are looking to create high quality online experiences for students.


2:00 – 2:45 Concurrent Sessions

#technology #filmeducation #noncognitiveskills

Ana-Maria Dragomir and Varun Puri

45 minute presentation

In this session, we are opening up a conversation about the ways in which the implementation of technology in education can address the development of non-cognitive skills, such as curiosity, empathy, collaboration, creativity and critical thinking. Scholars who contribute to this conversation, point out that technology is dramatically changing almost every domain of human activity. One such domain is mass media, which today stretches from television to vlogs and social media, and from podcasts to video games and beyond. It could be interesting to reflect on and to discuss the role that mass-media plays in shaping a sense of awareness about the world, and in fostering or inhibiting non-cognitive skills. The conversations about technology and education point to the fact that schools have not sufficiently integrated the use of technology in their pedagogical practices, and that the some of the most creative uses of technology, particularly among youth, usually occur outside of the school system. We are opening up the conversation with a short discussion about film education. Drawing on fieldwork research and ongoing conversations, this discussion will invite reflection on how film education can potentially address media literacy, the introduction of technology in the classroom, the circulation of knowledge, and the development of non-cognitive skills.


Twitter as a Teaching Tool in the Social Science Classroom

Liam Stockdale

15 minute presentation

Social media platforms have become a primary channel through which we consume news and information about current events. As an instructor in the social sciences, I have been experimenting with ways to effectively leverage this medium to help students connect what they learn in the classroom to what is happening “real world”, thereby enhancing both their engagement with course material and their capacity to apply their knowledge toward developing more sophisticated understandings of social reality. This session will share my experiences developing and integrating Twitter-based activities in two first-year social science courses—a small seminar-style inquiry-based course, and a large introductory lecture course. In addition to explaining “how” I went about it, I will discuss both how the use of Twitter has improved the learning environment, as well as the major difficulties I have encountered in each context. The overall aim will be to stimulate further discussion about the merits of integrating social media in undergraduate teaching and additional techniques for doing so.


My Ongoing Experiment with Using Social Media to Increase Student Engagement in #MacIntroPsych: Preliminary Findings, #sofarsogood.

Joe Kim

15 minute presentation

Twitter, as a professional social media tool, allows you to promote research interests, engage with your students, and create curated archives on a variety of topics. In this session, I will share what I have learned over the last year using Twitter to promote my lab research interests in Applied Cognition in Education and engage with my #MacIntroPsych students. I have found quality tweets beats quantity; time and thoughtful effort will build a following. Creative ideas like a contest that challenges students to create Memes that demonstrate course content are fun ways to interact outside of the class.  Our course #MacIntroPsych hashtag has also serves as a record of the interesting things that happen in my teaching (in real time) and often generates interest from those not even taking the course. As I continue in my Twitter experiment, I continue to refine and find better ways to bring in students and teach them that learning continues outside the class.


Keeping Faculty and Students Engaged in an Online Course

Ilana Bayer

15 minute presentation

The success of an online course can depend greatly on how actively engaged the faculty and students are with each other, with the content, and with the technology. There are a number of challenges that faculty face when designing and delivering their online courses that can directly affect the level of engagement. This session will explore some of these challenges and discuss strategies to increase engagement drawing on lessons learned from Educational Technologies in Higher Education –an online course in the MSc Health Science Education program.


Chasing the Dream: The Engaged Learner

Dan Piedra

15 minute presentation

The term “engaging” is used so often today in describing learning needs and expectations that one begins to tune it out as part of the everyday learning lexicon. In a world where more and more of what we do everywhere is in some way linked to technology, it should come as no surprise that the learning and development space would be affected in a similar way. Authoring software seems to have taken over as the flavour of the day in that domain. That being said, technology is not the only way to achieve an engaging experience with learners, in fact in many cases it is far from that. While it sometimes holds the key to engagement, it is not always necessary. Just the same, let’s explore this important concept. Come prepared to share your success stories in terms of achieving high levels of engagement with or without technology.


Peer Review in PebblePad 

Jon Kruitof

15 minute presentation

Peer review is an effective way to engage students in providing each other feedback which can deepen learning. PebblePad is not just restricted to peer reviewing portfolios, but can be used to peer review any document. This session will cover the ways that you can use PebblePad at McMaster as a central hub for peer review activity.


Individual Assessment vs. Participatory Learning

Wendy D’Angelo

I will explain my rationale for a blended model of learning and assessment in a large-scale foreign language class. Since single instructors cannot impose stringent oversight constraints on the quality of collaborative project, the individual knowledge base of the student contributor must be very strong from the onset. The knowledge base should also include and promote participatory learning, but what about the individual responsibility of the student team member?  Through meaningful instructional scaffolding and guidance on self-directed learning, teachers can help students produce quality projects. An example will be provided.


3:00 – 4:00 – Roundtable Discussions (Council Chambers)

This session brings all participants back together to discuss areas of interest or topics they want to learn more about. Topics include: social media, Copyright and digital lending/Copyleft, Team-based approaches to online course development, student engagement, open educational content, and Where do I start with technology? Participants will have the opportunity to join discussion on at least two topics. Have other topics in mind? You will be able to choose your own table topic and invite other interested parties to begin the conversation.

 


Wednesday Oct. 19, 2016

9:30 – 10:15 Concurrent Sessions

“Jump In, Start, and Go! It’s the Right Thing to Do”: Developing an Online Teaching and Learning Resource on Accessibility

Ali Babar, Kate Brown, Alise de Bie, and Shaila Kumbhare

45 minute presentation

Since the passing of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) in 2005, post-secondary institutions have been actively working to meet technical legislative compliance as well as to proactively enhance accessibility and the inclusion of students/faculty/staff with disabilities on campus. Many schools are turning to technology to develop, host, and disseminate resources and trainings related to the AODA and accessibility. At McMaster, the Accessibility in Teaching and Learning team has been developing an online training module for all instructional staff that will be released in 2017, as well as a short introductory video intended to inspire educators to further integrate accessibility into course design and classroom practices. In this presentation, we will screen our video of interviews with McMaster faculty sharing their values, motivations, and commitments related to integrating accessible teaching and learning principles into their courses. We hope to solicit participant feedback on this resource. In the process, we will illustrate what an accessible approach to developing an accessibility video might look like – by especially highlighting the importance of community consultation and the meaningful involvement of students and instructors with disabilities.


Differentiating Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality for Education

Jason Lamb

45 minute presentation

The relatively recent increase in computing power available to consumers (whether it be via smartphones or personal computers) has allowed for a growing abundance of AR and VR ready devices, each of which provides the computing and video processing capabilities needed for augmented and virtual reality in our classrooms. Rapidly decreasing costs have also allowed these technologies to become relatively affordable, and many academic institutions have already begun to integrate the technologies within their own classrooms. As these distinct yet similar technologies become increasingly available and ingrained in the public consciousness, it is wise to discuss and differentiate between the two technologies as we consider them for our own use. In this talk I will discuss the definitions, attributes, and brief history of each technology (augmented reality and virtual reality) in an effort to provide clarity on what exactly AR and VR are. Afterwards, Jason will discuss and show examples of how the technologies are being used in our classrooms today. This discussion will also include information on his own work with the McMaster Anatomy Lab and their pending investigation on the use of the Microsoft HoloLens, as they seek to determine the effectiveness of augmented reality’s ability to replace cadavers within their educational program.


Learning Technologies and Foundational Skills in a Level-I Social Sciences ‘Foundations’ Course

Mark Busser

45 minute presentation

This presentation will share some of the ways in which various learning technologies have been implemented in the context of Social Sciences 1T03, a skills-based course at McMaster. A goal of the course design has been to find ways to connect Learning Management features such as visual widgets, gamification badges, and quizzes with interactive online content and in-person tutorials, with the latter taking place in newly-opened active learning classrooms.


10:30 – 11:15 Concurrent Sessions


Assistive Technology Training for Students with Intellectual Disabilities in an Inclusive Post Secondary Program

Jennifer Curry Jahnke, Kimberly Maich, and Camille Rutherford

45 minute presentation

The Community Integration through Cooperative Education (CICE) program for students with intellectual disabilities or significant learning disabilities is an inclusive post-secondary program. Mohawk College CICE students are currently dependent upon the Learning Facilitators (LF) for support with the completion of homework, assignments, projects and sometimes the use of age-appropriate social communication skills. Providing an assistive technology enriched environment would significantly support the CICE students’ independent learning and increase their overall learning outcomes. The desired outcome is for the research to demonstrate that students with intellectual disabilities in the CICE post-secondary program have significantly higher learning outcomes and independence when using assistive technologies. Researchers will present the findings from the year-long study, demonstrating quantitative pre- and post-assessment results, assistive technology assessments and training, as well as qualitative focus group discussions. Currently in the data collection phase, the results should demonstrate the efficacy of using assistive technology to support the CICE student population in increasing their core curriculum learning outcomes, while presenting areas for program development.


Layering Reality to Enhance Learning and Special Events

Humaira Siddiqui and Kathleen Oakey

45 minute presentation

Augmented reality apps are exploding in popularity around the world. From self-guided tours of cities to retail marketing innovations, augmented reality apps are gaining in popularity. Augmented reality is the real-time layering of digital data over our existing world. Our session will provide an overview of augmented reality and some of the more interesting apps that are currently available. We will then present some uses for augmented reality in the classroom and demonstrate how we used this technology to enhance a special event at Sheridan.


Synchronous Collaboration Through WebEx

Lavinia Oltean and Jon Kruithof

Introducing WebEx, McMaster’s new web conferencing tool. You may be familiar with WebEx from attending a meeting with video conferencing, but come experience what WebEx’s Training Centre can do for blended and online classes.


11:30 – 12:15 – Invited Speaker Session (Council Chambers)

eCampusOntario: Driving Growth and Innovation in Technology-Enabled Learning

David Porter

After one year of operations, eCampusOntario is proud of its accomplishments and excited about its future. Cathy Newell Kelly (University of Waterloo), Linda Rees (formerly, Algonquin College) and the eCO team did a stellar job of launching the initiative in 2015-16 and implementing its portal to online programs, courses and services. With Dr. David Porter, its new leader at the helm, the organization is poised to advance online learning in Ontario by further supporting institutions with their design and development projects in online and technology-enabled learning. The current calls for proposals for development, research and innovation projects have been enthusiastically supported – so much so that we are currently at the first stage of evaluation for over 170 proposals. It is truly an exciting time for online learning development in Ontario. During this session, David will provide a quick snapshot of things underway at eCampusOntario, a glimpse of a vision for the future, and some reflections on contemporary trends and initiatives that are playing out in Canada, the United States, and beyond.


1:00 – 1:45 Concurrent Sessions

Preparing Students for Success, Before They Arrive on Campus

Andrew Staples

15 minute presentation

Students often arrive on campus unprepared and overwhelmed. To help better prepare our students, Sheridan has created an online transition program that helps students adjust to college life, even before they arrive on campus! Prior to starting at Sheridan, students are enrolled into an online virtual community that is specific to their program. Through interactive weekly activities, online webinars, and video tutorials, the virtual community allows students to start their program with a holistic understanding of how to be a successful student. Using technology, students are able to connect with their peers, meet their student advisor, plan their semester, be informed about academic integrity, and more! Join Andrew Staples, Student Advisor for the General Arts & Science programs at Sheridan College, as he demonstrates how technology, mobility, and webinars have helped shape and prepare students for an exciting post-secondary experience.


Increasing Participation and Completion Rates Among Academically At-risk Students

Catharine Ozols and Krislynn McKinlay

15 minute presentation

Bounce Back is one of Mohawk’s college and career skills development programs for academically at-risk students – those who earned a “Promote with Advice”, “Probation”, or “Compulsory Withdrawal” probation status in the previous semester. Students are encouraged to enroll in Bounce Back when they receive the bad news in their promotion email and have the first 8 weeks of the semester to complete the flexible 15 hour, 4 module program either online or in a blended format. Those who successfully complete the program qualify for recognition on their Co-Curricular Record and also are eligible for one of two $200 awards based on their semester to semester academic improvement. At its inception in Fall 2014, Bounce Back was a traditional delivery of 4 lecture-style weekly workshops with 4 self-directed practical activities to reinforce and apply concepts. Bounce Back moved to a more flipped approach over the next few semesters providing students more time to interact with each other and apply their learning in the workshops. This session details how this program has evolved and the lessons learned in the process.


Visualization of Complex Anatomy Using Augmented Reality

Michael Romaniuk, Josh Mitchell, Giancarlo Pukas, and Lilian Wolak

45 minute presentation

We have previously shown that virtual reality (VR) and pictures are about 30% less efficacious than 3D models in learning real anatomy. The superiority of models may be due to a learning effect inherent in physically handling the model or that the 3D cadaver used for the test is most similar to the 3D model, which leads to transfer-appropriate processing (TAP). However, when physical handling of the models is removed, no significant difference in the mean scores between the groups that handle the model or view the model. TAP was also shown to be insignificant. Further research has shown that the removal of stereopsis with and eye patch removes the superiority of the models for learning anatomy. We have concluded that true 3D is required for the most effective anatomy learning. Manufacturers of augmented and virtual reality systems suggest that holograms are indistinguishable from real objects. We are testing if anatomy produced for the HoloLens holographic lens is comparable to real objects in learning anatomy. This research was supported by the Education Program in Anatomy at the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University and the MacPherson Institute.


Developing and Supporting Faculty in Using Educational Technologies in Higher Education

lana Bayer, Zafar Syed, and Peggy French

45 minute presentation

McMaster University and Mohawk College exemplify the growing interest in the use of educational technology in higher education as seen through increasing integration of technology within the classroom setting and the growing number of online course and program offerings. Despite this encouraging progress, the adoption of educational technologies is uneven amongst faculty. The increased integration of technology in the design and delivery of curricula has signaled the need for developing new skills and competencies for faculty. In this session, we will discuss outcomes from institutional initiatives (top-down as well as bottom-up) that seek to address the emerging digital pedagogy landscape, including a large scale needs assessment study and programming to build faculty capacity. We hope to engage with participants’ own experiences in this area to identify practical solutions.


2:00 – 2:45 Concurrent Sessions


The Undergraduate Student Research Hub: A Consolidated Online Resource for Aspiring Researchers

Anna Goshua, Michael Sun, Ishan Aditya, and Tony Chen

15 minute presentation

Educational literature consistently demonstrates the multifaceted benefits of having students engage in research at an undergraduate level. However, undergraduate students are often ill-prepared and lack the resources needed to find research opportunities that interest them and prepare successful applications. In acknowledgement of this prevalent issue, the Undergraduate Research Student Committee is preparing an interactive, open educational resource, made for students by students. Hosted on an official McMaster server and affiliated with the Office of Undergraduate Research, this website will built on the open source Plone content management system and compile and render essential tools easily accessible to students. Moreover, the website will feature a mobile-friendly platform for ease of use. A key component of the website will be an innovative, interactive calendar that is regularly populated with upcoming research events at which students can present their work. It will also include a comprehensive list of research internships and jobs, and scholarship deadlines. This calendar will be maintained semi-autonomously through a programmed “Web crawler”, the function of which is to search for and index predetermined web pages in accordance with designated keywords. Additionally, the website will host resources such as sample curriculum vitae and cover letters, as well as advice for drafting project and the ethics approval process. Questions will be solicited from the undergraduate population to create an extensive frequently asked questions section tailored to student needs. The entire website will be subject to redesign based on the feedback provided by students. Lastly, live streams featuring undergraduate students with research experience, graduate students, and professors will be hosted on the website. Students will be invited to have their questions answered in real-time.


Learning Technologies Challenges Unique to Developing Countries’ Environments

A.Hakim Etleb

15 minute presentation

Learning Technologies represent a significant potential and opportunity in developing countries; they can play a major role in delivering training and knowledge in an effective and cost efficient manner to disadvantaged places. There are, however, a number of challenges that limit this potential. An example is the lack of adequate and reliable communication and computer infrastructure. Most learning content seems to be moving toward increased usage of media that require higher levels of speed and capacity e.g., video. During the last few years, Etleb was directly involved in projects and initiatives for the implementation of learning technologies in Libya. That experience underscored the unique perspective of learning technologies in that kind of environment, both in terms of potential and challenges.


An Automated Grading System for Math Oriented Engineering Courses

Gaganpreet Sidhu and Seshasai Srinivasan

15 minute presentation

In this work, we present the development and implementation of an automated grading system (AGS) into McMaster University’s online course management system, Avenue to Learn. This efficient grading system has been developed for two courses involving significant mathematical analysis at the School of Engineering Practice and Technology, namely, Finite Element Analysis and Discrete Mathematics. In these courses, the students take the tests/exam in two parts. In Part-A of the assessment, the students write/derive the solutions in the answer booklet, showing all work. Subsequently, upon completion of this part and with instructor authorization, the students participate in Part-B of the assessment where their calculations from several parts of every question are entered from the answer booklet into an online form. The online form is carefully designed with fill-in-the blanks and multi-select questions, so that students are unable to derive any hints or answers from the form. This is a timed task, usually lasting about 15% of the total exam time. Thus, the length of Part-B of the assessment is such that it is only sufficient for the students to enter their data from Part-A and they are unable to make any changes in the answer booklet. Upon completion of this form, the test/exam is immediately evaluated by the AGS and a grade for the test/exam is instantaneously calculated for the grade book. In addition to a quick turnaround of student scores with significant time saving in grading, this AGS helps minimize mental fatigue in instructors who handle several courses in a single term. It must be clarified that this AGS is not the same as a multiple-choice exam.


Digital Badges! What Are They? Do We Need Them?

Jon Kruithof

15 minute presentation

Digital badges have been a hot topic in educational technology. What are they? How can they help? This introductory session will talk specifically about using badges in class and badges in education.


MacAnatomy: A Unique Web-based Approach to the Delivery of Anatomic Education

Xyza Brual, and Ilana Bayer

45 minute presentation

MacAnatomy (http://macanatomy.mcmaster.ca) is an online portal for the Education Program in Anatomy at McMaster University. It was developed to deliver effective anatomic education in an anytime, anyplace format. Effective clinical anatomy teaching involves integrating physical and digital resources in a meaningful way. MacAnatomy houses digitized, labeled prosections as well as other learning objects such as models, illustrations, purpose-built HD anatomy videos, lecture captures and standalone e-learning modules. The site has approximately 6,000 pages and over 50 GB of material. It is used as both a standalone resource as well as a resource used in conjunction with the physical specimens in the anatomy lab. In this session, we’ll provide an overview of MacAnatomy, discuss team collaboration and technologies that were used to design and develop the site, our research findings on user experience and usability of the site as well as next steps for development (e.g., pathology learning tools). Participants will have the opportunity to explore the site on their own devices.


3:00 – 3:30 Closing Discussion (Council Chambers)

The final session brings us back together to share our main takeaways from the past two days and identify next steps for technology integration in our own practice. The session will also feature chances to win signed copies of Barbara Oakley’s books.


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